Letters Home From War

I’ve recently come into possession of a series of letters sent home by a Pvt. Georgie Mando over the course of his two-year stint in the European Theatre of World War Two. First, some details about Georgie:

Georgie Mando was born in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He was eighteen years old when he enlisted to fight in the war. By 1943 he had graduated basic training and was on his way to the front lines. Having lost his father at a young age Georgie was the man of his house, so no war could keep him from writing home to his mother Agnes and younger sister Susan.

In the interests of keeping his heart-rending tale of glory and valor alive, I present them to you now, to keep history alive. Please note that this is not all of the correspondence that he sent, only that which I have. All typos are Georgie’s…

Dear Ma,

How are things going? I’m writing to let you know that I returned from my first mission today. Things went pretty well, I think. I’m told they start you off easy and I guess they’re right. They sent me into an enemy base to steal some top secret files.

It turns out that the German soldiers go down pretty easy. It only takes two or three shots to kill them. Any one of our boys can take three times that. In the course of the mission I killed at least twelve of them.

And though I was only given a pistol to begin with, I found a rifle in the enemy base. I have a feeling that will come in handy. You know I love you guys. Give little Susie a hug for me.

Love,
Georgie.

Sept. 28th, 1943

– – – – –

Dear Ma,

I got your letter last week, Ma, but I’ve been too busy to reply until today. I’m glad to hear that Susie is doing well in school, she’s going to be a really smart girl when she’s all grown up.

Things have been getting hectic lately. I’ve been on a few missions since my last letter. Most recently I had to plant a bomb in a heavily guarded castle. Things were looking pretty rough, so I started pushing around on the walls and found a secret passage! The wall just slid right open and I found myself in a room filled with all kinds of treasure, plus a chaingun! After that, I really had no problem getting to my objective and planting the bomb. Sarge was really pleased with my work. He gave me 12000 points and an overall score of 98%! I’m happy, but I do wish I had found that one soldier remaining soldier so I could have got the full hundred.

Love,
Georgie.

December 13, 1943

– – – – –

Dear Ma,

Today I had to fight a tank! But I’m getting ahead of myself and you didn’t raise Georgie Mando to have improper manners. I got your letter and I’m happy that you made so much money at the baked goods sale. I sure wish I were back there having some of those brownies now.

You got Susie a dog? Good for her! And she named it Rufus? That is a cute name. Send her and the puppy my love and tell Susie that I wish her a happy birthday.

Today’s mission was really something else! It started off pretty typicly with me having to fight my way across an occupied city. Everything was going along well at first. I even picked up a flamethrower on the way, I’m building up quite the arsenal. But when I was almost done I got to this bridge and there was a tank on it. Before I have a chance to move it shot down the building behind me, so I was left with no choice but to fight. My guns weren’t doing anything to it. The only thing keeping me alive was how slow the thank moved. It took me a while to catch on, but every now and then a German guy would pop out of the top and throw a grenade at me. I took to catching the grenades and throwing them back before the guy close the hatch to the inside. After I did that three times, the tank exploded and my mission was completed! It was rough, but that’s war.

Love,
Georgie.

February 1, 1944

– – – – –

Dear Ma,

Thanks for the letter last week. Your letters are what keep me going in the constant battle. It’s non-stop bloodshed out here. I’ve killed at least two hundred Germans, plus the occasional German Shepard out here. Remember when I told you that they only take three hits to kill? Well I forgot to mention that they become tougher when they get promoted. Some of the high ranking Germans can take up to ten bullets. It can get pretty rough.

Yesterday I was in my worst battle yet. I was fighting my way through another occupied city and I walked into a room and found myself surrounded by German Captains (the high ranking guys also get better weapons, in this case chainguns). They all turned and barked out the usual “Halt!” or “Schweinhund!” and started firing at me. I took down two of them with a few quick headshots, but I was still being pumped full of bullets by four other Captains.

I didn’t know what to do! I thought I was a gonner! I took down another one and ran back out of the room I came through. I tried strafing back and forth by the door and shooting them, but they were coming too quick. I ran to the next room and, thank the good Lord, I found a box of 50% health. With that I was able to kill all of them. I got my first 100% on this mission too. I was scared, but everything turned out good in the end.

Also, I’m saddened to learn that Rufus was killed by the Mayor. Tell Susie to keep her chin up and that I love her.

Love,
Georgie.

August 18, 1944.

– – – – –

Dear Ma,

I got a rocket launcher on my last mission, so now I’ve got all the weapons that I can possibly get. Also, I found a secret mission. I was just pressing on the walls again, I do a lot of that, you’d be surprised at how many secret passages there are in Germany, and I found an alternate exit to the mission I was on. Taking that one I ended up in with a secret mission where I got to collect all sorts of treasure. It was a nice change of pace.

It upsets me to learnt hat Susie has been kicked out of school. It’s a shame, but I’m sure that with you to learn from she’ll still be able to learn enough to become a successful wife to some rich gentleman someday.

Love,
Georgie.

October 28, 1944

– – – – –

Dear Ma,

Yesterday I fought the Boss. It was really, really tough. He was riding in this strange flying mashine that shot rockets and had guns. It was sort of a cross between a zeppelin and a plane. I was on the top of the Castle in the middle of Berlin. I was able to use my flamethrower to bring him down, but then I had to fight him again after he mutated into a huge monster. I was almost dead when my last rocket hit him in the head and blew him up.

Don’t bother replying to this letter. Now that the war is over, I should be home quick. I’ll probably be back in time for poor Susie’s funeral.

Love,
Georgie.

May 12, 1945

Be seeing you very soon,
Georgie

Patrick D Ryall, the D is for Bruise
Originally posted on Contains2 Saturday 16 April 2005

  1. I was just pressing on the walls again, I do a lot of that, you’d be surprised at how many secret passages there are in Germany, and I found an alternate exit to the mission I was on.

    Hilarious, although I’m disappointed that this wasn’t an actual trove of letters from the Ryall family trunk.

  2. If there is such a trove of letters, I do not have access to it. And the family is so huge they would be likely never to find their way to me.

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